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Privacy online tra bambini e adolescenti: concezione, preoccupazione e tutela

  • Giovanni Vespoli

The general aim of this study is to investigate how kids and adolescents conceptualize online privacy and the concern about their online privacy through a developmental perspective, while also trying to understand its impact on a safe online surfing environment. Three studies were conducted: 1) a systematic review, which was aimed to clarify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the literature about the construct of online privacy and online privacy concerns among kids and adolescents; 2) a qualitative study, aimed to understand how adolescents define – and consequently understand – the concept of online privacy; 3) a quantitative study, which aimed at addressing whether online surfing is associated with online privacy concerns and with GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) differently across different ages during adolescence. Finally, the results of the three studies were analysed and discussed in light of the theory background. An analysis of the literature showed how children may have difficulties to fully understand risks in unusual contexts, and that they can have difficulties in responding to situations when they struggled to recognise or understand fully the risks involved. The results of the three studies are discussed, underlining how adolescents understand their online privacy, if they are concerned about their data online, how we should help them manage better their privacy online, and how we should design services, applications and devices to help kids understand better the implication of the Internet on their ‘onlife’ (Floridi, 2015).

  • Keywords:
  • Adolescents,
  • Concern,
  • GDPR,
  • Kids,
  • Online Privacy,
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Giovanni Vespoli

University of Florence, Italy - ORCID: 0000-0002-3440-2628

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  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Pages: 121-131
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
  • © 2022 Author(s)

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  • Publication Year: 2022
  • Content License: CC BY 4.0
  • © 2022 Author(s)

Chapter Information

Chapter Title

Privacy online tra bambini e adolescenti: concezione, preoccupazione e tutela

Authors

Giovanni Vespoli

Language

Italian

DOI

10.36253/979-12-215-0081-3.13

Peer Reviewed

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Bibliographic Information

Book Title

Esercizi di ricerca

Book Subtitle

Dottorato e politiche per la formazione

Editors

Vanna Boffo, Fabio Togni

Peer Reviewed

Number of Pages

278

Publication Year

2022

Copyright Information

© 2022 Author(s)

Content License

CC BY 4.0

Metadata License

CC0 1.0

Publisher Name

Firenze University Press

DOI

10.36253/979-12-215-0081-3

ISBN Print

979-12-215-0094-3

eISBN (pdf)

979-12-215-0081-3

eISBN (xml)

979-12-215-0082-0

Series Title

Studies on Adult Learning and Education

Series ISSN

2704-596X

Series E-ISSN

2704-5781

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